Skip to content

Take Care of Your Pothos and Watch out for Calcium Oxalates

When caring for your pothos, you need to be aware of the dangers of calcium oxalates. These needle-like crystals can pierce the mouth, throat, and digestive tract, causing intense pain and inflammation if ingested. Symptoms of contact can show up within two hours, but may continue on for up to two weeks. Fortunately, there are some easy tips and tricks to protect your beloved pothos and keep it healthy. Read on to learn how to care for your pothos and avoid contact with calcium oxalates.

Caring for Pothos Plants to Avoid Disease

Pothos plants are popular houseplants due to their easy care requirements and attractive foliage. However, if not cared for properly, a pothos can become diseased. Symptoms of disease include:

  • Water-drenched spots on the leaves that have yellow halos around them
  • The centers of these spots may fall out

To prevent this from happening, it is important to:

  • Avoid overhead watering
  • Discard any infected plants immediately

Over or underwatering is the most common cause of yellowing in pothos plants. A leaf that appears yellow and brown is likely to be overwatered, while if you notice yellow leaves and some brown spots on additional leaves, then the cause could be underwatering.

Another indicator of overwatering is pale green leaves. When a pothos plant has too much light, the leaves will compensate for the lack of light by turning green since only the green parts of the leaves can make energy. Your plant is getting too much light if you notice pale yellow leaves.

Healthy pothos leaves are:

  • Bright and waxy
  • Have a pointed heart shape
  • Can be green, yellow, or pale green

It is rare for them to flower or produce berries indoors, but some varieties have small, white flowers that feature small berries.

Solutions for Reviving Your Pothos Plant

Fortunately, there is a resolution in both cases. Repotting your pothos can help to restore it to its former glory. When repotting, you should use a pot filled with a light and well-draining mix. If you want to make your own houseplant mix, you can amend the soil with coconut coir and perlite for added drainage capacity. Doing this will help ensure that water does not become trapped in the soil for too long and cause root rot or other diseases.

Additionally, you should check if your pothos is receiving sufficient light and water. If it is not growing, then it may not be getting enough of either of these two essential elements. You can give your pothos extra light by placing it in a well-lit spot or using artificial lighting such as grow lights. As for water, make sure to keep the soil moist but not soggy and to water more frequently during the summer months when plants are actively growing.

However, if the issue is an infestation of mealybugs or scale, then it is important to act quickly. Mealybugs and scale are two of the most common insect pests found on pothos plants. Mealybugs look like small balls of cotton while scale are dark colored bumps on leaves. As a result of their feeding activity, plant sap is reduced and nutrients are diverted from leaves. If the infestation is high, the leaves will become distorted and stunted.

Steps to Revive Your Pothos Plant:

  • Repot your pothos using a light and well-draining mix
  • Amend the soil with coconut coir and perlite for added drainage capacity
  • Ensure your pothos is receiving sufficient light and water
  • Give your pothos extra light by placing it in a well-lit spot or using artificial lighting such as grow lights
  • Keep the soil moist but not soggy and water more frequently during the summer months
  • Act quickly if your pothos is infested with mealybugs or scale
Common PestsAppearanceEffects
MealybugsSmall balls of cottonReduced plant sap and diverted nutrients from leaves
ScaleDark colored bumps on leavesDistorted and stunted leaves

Protecting Pothos Plants from Too Much Sunlight

On the other hand, too much sun can also be a problem for pothos plants. Too much sunlight can cause sunburns on the leaves, which will show up as white or yellow patches on the variegated parts of the leaves. Unfortunately, these sunburns are permanent and cannot be healed; they must be trimmed off if desired. If your pothos is in direct sunlight, you should move it to an area with indirect light or provide some shade to prevent further damage from occurring.

To protect your pothos plant from too much sunlight, you can follow these tips:

TipsDescription
1.Choose the right location – Place your pothos plant in an area with indirect light. Avoid placing it in direct sunlight.
2.Provide shade – If your pothos plant is in an area with direct sunlight, provide some shade by using a sheer curtain or blinds.
3.Rotate the plant – Rotate your pothos plant regularly to ensure that all sides receive equal amounts of light.
4.Trim sunburned leaves – If your pothos plant has sunburned leaves, trim them off to prevent further damage.

By following these tips, you can protect your pothos plant from too much sunlight and ensure that it stays healthy and vibrant.

Temperature Considerations for Pothos Plants

When caring for your pothos plants, it is important to consider the temperature. Different plant types have different temperature requirements. For example, Sanseveria is a very hardy plant species that can tolerate temperatures as low as 40°F, while Pothos cannot tolerate temperatures below 65°F.

To ensure the health of your pothos plants, follow these temperature guidelines:

  • Keep your pothos indoors during the winter months if you live in an area with cold winters.
  • Avoid exposing your plants to sudden temperature changes or drafts of cold air as this can cause stress and shock.

Remember, maintaining the appropriate temperature is crucial for the health and longevity of your pothos plants.

The Rare and Sought-After Harlequin Pothos

  • When it comes to pothos, one of the rarest and hardest to find varieties is Harlequin Pothos.
  • This pothos has a unique look, featuring variegated leaves that resemble a blend between marble and snow queen pothos with an even more vibrant coloration than Manjula.
  • Its distinctive appearance makes it highly sought after by plant collectors, making it hard to come by in most cases.
CharacteristicsDescription
RarityOne of the rarest and hardest to find varieties of pothos
AppearanceVariegated leaves resembling a blend between marble and snow queen pothos
ColorationEven more vibrant than Manjula
PopularityHighly sought after by plant collectors

Potential Health Risks of Pothos Plants

  • Pothos plants can be toxic to both humans and animals.
  • If ingested, the plant can cause nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and diarrhea.
  • Symptoms can occur immediately or up to 2 hours after ingestion, and may continue for up to two weeks.
  • Medical attention may be necessary if the symptoms are severe or if they persist for more than a few days.
  • The plant itself is not fatal when ingested in small amounts, but it does have the potential of causing an allergic reaction in some people.
  • Always handle pothos plants with caution.

It is important to note that pothos plants can be toxic to both humans and animals. If ingested, the plant can cause nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. Symptoms can occur immediately or up to 2 hours after ingestion, and may continue for up to two weeks. In some cases, medical attention may be necessary if the symptoms are severe or if they persist for more than a few days. It is also important to note that even though the plant itself is not fatal when ingested in small amounts, it does have the potential of causing an allergic reaction in some people so it should always be handled with caution.

Dangers of Calcium Oxalate Poisoning

One of the more serious dangers associated with pothos plants is calcium oxalate poisoning. Calcium oxalates are needle-like crystals that can pierce the mouth, throat, and digestive tract as they pass through and cause an intense pain and inflammation. When it comes in contact with skin or conjunctiva, it can also cause significant discomfort.

Symptoms of calcium oxalate poisoning include:

  • Intense pain in the mouth and throat
  • Swelling in the mouth or throat
  • Difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • Abdominal pain and vomiting

It is important to note that if you suspect your pet has ingested a pothos plant then you should seek medical attention right away as this type of poisoning can be fatal if left untreated.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Calcium oxalates are needle-like crystals that can cause intense pain and inflammation when it comes in contact with the mouth, throat, and digestive tract. Symptoms can manifest immediately or up to two hours after ingestion, and may continue for up to two weeks. When it comes to caring for Pothos, it is important to ensure that it is getting the right amount of sunlight, water, and nutrition. Additionally, repotting is a good way to make sure that the plant is growing healthily. Finally, make sure to discard any infected plants in order to avoid any further spread of the infection.